Hope for Patients with Psoriasis That Also Suffer from Depression

SKIN-The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine® Article: Review of suicide and depression in psoriasis and management of suicide warnings

It is therefore imperative that careful medical histories are obtained in order to closely monitor patients and to determine whether alternative therapies should be considered.”

— Emily Leibowitz, BA

NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES, March 12, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Psoriasis is a chronic skin condition that presents itself as red plaques. Because of the impact on appearance that this disease has, depression often accompanies this disease.

Depression is a mental health condition that presents with a persistently depressed mood and loss of interest in activities. Both of these conditions can cause significant difficulties to daily life. The inflammatory molecules that are found in psoriasis have also been found in patients with depression. It is possible to target these molecules with injectable medications called biologics.

In this issue of SKIN, Lebowitz et al. review the evidence behind the link between psoriasis and depression, and they discuss the specific effects of different medications. The authors note “Therapies that target the pro-inflammatory cytokines elevated in psoriasis have demonstrated substantial clinical efficacy across a number of clinical trials and should therefore be considered for those with moderate-to-severe or recalcitrant disease.”

Lebowitz et al. present information from the clinical trials that led to the approval of 2 psoriasis medications – brodalumab and apremilast. Both of these medications mention a risk of depression and suicidality in their package inserts. The authors note “It is nevertheless evident that patients with known psychiatric conditions or prior histories of suicidal behavior may be at slightly increased risk of adverse psychiatric effects when starting a new biologic… It is therefore imperative that careful medical histories are obtained in order to closely monitor patients and to determine whether alternative therapies should be considered.”

SKIN: The Journal of Cutaneous Medicine® is a peer-reviewed online medical journal that is the official journal of The National Society for Cutaneous Medicine. The mission of SKIN is to provide an enhanced and accelerated route to disseminate new dermatologic knowledge for all aspects of cutaneous disease.

For more details please visit www.jofskin.org or contact jofskin@gmail.com.

Link to article

(DOI: 10.25251/skin.3.2.39)

Mark Lebwohl
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
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Source: EIN Presswire