Remembering Wild Horse Annie

Photo of Wild Horse Annie, Velma Bronn Johnston

Velma Bronn Johnston

Closing Women’s History Month 2021 With a Tribute to Velma Bronn Johnston

ATLANTA, GEORGIA, UNITED STATES, March 31, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — March 31st marks the final day of Women’s History Month. The Library of Congress shares the following on the website women’shistorymonth.gov. “Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.” Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as “Women’s History Week.” In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, presidents have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.” These proclamations celebrate the contributions women have made to the United States and recognize the specific achievements women have made over the course of American history in a variety of fields.”

For members of our country’s equine protection community the work of Wild Horse Annie is remembered for her dedication to protecting wild horses. Velma Bronn Johnston was born on March 5, 1912 and later became known as Wild Horse Annie due to her efforts to protect America’s wild horses from mustangers who hunted the horses for commercial purposes.

She is also recognized for her grassroots work to stop the decimation of mustangs and free-roaming burros from public lands. She was able to generate public support for the horses and burros through public appearances and the help of school children through letter writing campaigns. Newspapers published articles about the exploitation of wild horses and burros and the school children wrote letters to the Congress and Senate. As noted by the Associated Press on July 15, 1959: "Seldom has an issue touched such a responsive chord."

Velma Johnston worked to fight for protection of the free-roaming horses throughout Nevada and across all the federal lands in the west and is remembered by today’s wild horse advocates who still continue her work on state and federal levels to protect America’s free-roaming wild horses and burros.

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Source: EIN Presswire